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Anne Brooks' Ancestry

William DERMAN

Male Abt 1850 - Yes, date unknown


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  • Name William DERMAN  [1
    Born Abt 1850  Swindon, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Male 
    Died Yes, date unknown 
    Notes 
    • It would appear that William DERMAN managed to find himself in trouble with the law on several occasions as evidenced by newspaper reports:

      "Bristol Police Court: Friday, Before Mr. W. Terrell and Mr. W. H. Wills. Robbery From the Great Western Railway Company. William DERMAN, a youth of 17, was charged with stealing a brass plug, value of 5s, from the store room in the locomotive department of the Great Western Railway Company, his masters. Prisoner had been in the employ of the company for five or six months, and had been for two days engaged, as assistant clerk in the storeroom. Yesterday he was seen by a man name Fish, in the employ of the company, to take the plug off a shelf, and he was followed and searched, and the plug found in his pocket. The accused pleaded guilty to the charge, and was committed for three months, with hard labour." Western Daily Press, 8 December 1866.

      "William DERMAN, a respectable-looking young man, was charged with stealing two pairs of men's elastic-side boots, value 21s., the property of Messrs. Derham Brothers, of Barton-street. Mr. Thick appeared for the prisoner, who was a clerk in the employ of the complainants. It was shown that several pairs of boots had been missed lately, and the prisoner, being suspected, was watched. On Tuesday evening a pair of boots was found in his possession. Mr. Linthorpe, warehouseman, appeared to prove the case, and he said, in answer to Mr. Thick, that he had sold boots to the prisoner on previous occasions, and the transactions were entered in the books of the firm. Detective Rowland said he was called into the complainant's premises to take the accused into custody, and on heir wasy to the station the young man remarked he hope he would not be searched, as he had another pair of boots in his possession; and subsequently the property was found by the searcher. The prisoner pleaded guilty, and said he had a first-class character from his minister and late employer. Mr. Williams reminded him that he had already been before the bench for stealing from his previous masters, the Great Western Railway Company. The bench sentenced the accused to three months hard labour." Bristol Mercury, 10 October 1868. [3]
    Person ID I8699  Nosworthy
    Last Modified 21 Jun 2015 

    Family Celia IRELAND,   b. Abt 1850, Bradninch, Devon, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1876, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 26 years) 
    Married 1869  Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    • William and Celia married in the fourth quarter of 1869. Earlier that year, on the 20th March 1869, their names were published in the Gloucester Journal regarding the attempted suicide of William, and his rescue by Celia, presumably, the "IRELAND" fiancee in the article:

      ATTEMPT AT SUICIDE.
      A young man named William DERMAN, a clerk, attempted to commit suicide under romantic circumstances, near Stapleton, on Thursday. It seems that he met a young woman name IRELAND, to whom he had been engaged for some time. The lovers went for a stroll as far as Duchess's Woods, and while there something occurred which caused the young couple to separate. After seven or eight minutes had elapsed, however, Miss IRELAND went in search of the young man, and found him hanging by his is handkerchief to a projecting branch of a tree which had been hitherto concealed from her by the surrounding foliage. The young lady, acting with marvellous presence of mind and courage, succeeded in a very short time in severing the pocket handkerchief and lowering the youth to the ground. To do this she had to use extraordinary efforts. Having no knife at hand, and being unable to untie the knots in the handkerchief owing to their having been so tightly strained by the weight of the body, the young lady succeeded in reaching the handkerchief with her teeth, and actually bit it though sufficiently to make it too slender to bear the weight attached to it. Her lover was by that time quite insensible, and Miss IRELAND then screamed for help and attracted the attention of some workmen in an adjoining field. They immediately came to her assistance, and a gentleman in the neighborhood, on being told of the extraordinary occurrence, very kindly had the young man conveyed to the Infirmary in his wagonette. The unfortunate young man continued insensible, and is in a very precarious state. The family of the young man did not hear of the affair till the evening, when the young woman told them of the melancholy occurrence, and narrated the extraordinary way in which she succeeded in rescuing her lover from the perilous position which he had placed himself".

      Another article added:

      "In the Infirmary, the young man continued insensible, and subsequently had a fit; and though he had a short interval of sleep he afterwards became very restless, and moaned so much that it was found necessary, for the sake of the other patients, to remove him to a separate ward, where, we believe, he remained insensible up to a late hour that night. He is, of course, receiving every attention at the hands of the medical officers of the institution; be we learn that he is in a very precarious state. The family of the young man did not hear of the affair till the evening, when the young woman told them of the melancholy occurrence, and narraged the extraordinary way in which she succeeded in rescuing her lover from the perilous position in which he had placed himself. The father of the young man in an engine driveer, named Thos. DERMAN, in the employ of the Great Western Railway Company. During the evening the patient was visited by some members of his family, but, as we have already stated, he was still insensible. It is stated that the young man enjoyed tolerably good health, and his family had no cause for believing that his mind was affected. On the previous night, however, on following a younger brother to bed, he complained of feeling faint, and said he was in pain. We need hardly say that the occurrence has caused the greatest distress of mind both to the young man's betrothed and the members of his family." Taunton Courier and Western Advertiser, 24 March 1869.


      The article was republished widely among other newspapers at the time; several stated the fact that William DERMAN was nineteen years of age at the time of this event and that the young woman named IRELAND was living in Kingsland-road. [3]
    Last Modified 21 Jun 2015 
    Family ID F2172  Group Sheet

  • Sources 
    1. [S168] England and Wales Registration Index.

    2. [S144] Census of England, 1871.

    3. [S217] Newspaper.


  

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